Gothic Adaptations: Wuthering Heights

As 2018 marks the bicentenary of Emily Brontë’s birth it seems like the perfect time to re-read Wuthering Heights (1847). Ahead of the next GRG, Hannah Moss (a self-professed Wuthering Heights super-fan) takes us through some of the best (and worst) adaptations of Brontë’s novel… No question about it Wuthering Heights has to be one of … Continue reading Gothic Adaptations: Wuthering Heights

Gothic Bible: The Theo-Aesthetics of the Early British Gothic

The following post by Holly Hirst is part of an ongoing 'Gothic Bible Blog Series' and part of the Gothic Bible project, a collaborative project run by Sheffield Gothic and SIIBS at the University of Sheffield, and also the University of Auckland. You can find out more about the project here, and if you want … Continue reading Gothic Bible: The Theo-Aesthetics of the Early British Gothic

Recollections – 2013-14 Session Six: Selections from John Stagg’s The Minstrel of the North

Last week the Gothic Reading Group met to discuss a selection of pieces by the largely forgotten Romantic poet, John Stagg. Much of the conversation revolved around Stagg's place in relation to an existing scholarly understanding of the 18th and 19th century Gothic. This has lead Mark to produce a longer blog post than usual, … Continue reading Recollections – 2013-14 Session Six: Selections from John Stagg’s The Minstrel of the North

Foreshadowings: John Stagg, A Forgotten Gothic Poet

This week the Gothic Reading Group will boldly go where (to the best of our knowledge) no scholars have gone before as we tackle the forgotten Romantic-era poet, John Stagg. Ahead of the session Mark has been pondering where best to situate Stagg in our existing sense of eighteenth and nineteenth-century Gothic writing and doing … Continue reading Foreshadowings: John Stagg, A Forgotten Gothic Poet

Recollections – 2013-14 Session Two: Edgar Allen Poe’s "Berenice" (1835) and Charles Dickens’s "A Madman’s Manuscript" (1836)

This week sees our third meeting this term (and ninth session overall, fact-fans) but before we get stuck into Lovecraft, here'sKate Gadsby Macesumming up our last session on Poe and Dickens and highlighting some of the points around which our conversation turned.*****Nineteenth-Century Horrors: Marriage, Madness and the Middle-ClassKate Gadsby MaceBeing buried alive is equated to … Continue reading Recollections – 2013-14 Session Two: Edgar Allen Poe’s "Berenice" (1835) and Charles Dickens’s "A Madman’s Manuscript" (1836)